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One Belt One Road Experimental Theatre

Studio Theatre, Hong Kong Cultural Centre

18

Oct

8PM

19

Oct

8PM

20

Oct

4PM

20

Oct

8PM

One Belt One Road Experimental Theatre

Studio Theatre, Hong Kong Cultural Centre

  • Background

  • Director's Note

  • Video

  • 2017 Hong Kong Belt-Road Conference

  • 2017 Hong Kong Belt-Road Peformance

  • Background

    Hong Kong Belt-Road Cultural Innovation

     

    Along the One Belt One Road are all historical cities. The way in which traditional cultures encounter technology, economic development, and consumerism prompts a great number of traditional performing artists from the One Belt One Road cities to re-examine the direction of future development of traditional arts and culture.

    One Belt One Road Experimental Theatre is neither a simple demonstration of the eastern and western cultures, nor the kind of exchange that is simple and formalist. Rather, it is an exploration of technology, an exploration of new possibilities, experimentation, and collaboration of the expression of traditional craftsmanship and modern theatre.

    Danny Yung has always pioneered the experimentation of tradition. Since the 1990s, Yung has been interpreting “one table two chairs” from different perspectives, he has taken the traditional Chinese opera stage set-up as a platform for artists from all around the world and different sectors to carry out experimental creations.

    After the year 2000, a series of festivals, including Festival of Vision – Berlin/Hong Kong, Festival of Experimenting Traditions, the arts festival of Book of Ghost, Toki Arts Week, and so forth, have been developed as exchange projects for masters and young artists of traditional and contemporary theatres. All these have fostered cross-regional, cross-cultural, and cross-disciplinary dialogues, experiments and collaborations amongst traditional performing arts.

    From 19-20 October, Hong Kong Belt-Road City-to-City Cultural Exchange Conference 2018 will be held during the daytime, strategically exploring the opportunities for establishing cultural networks of think tank and applied researches combined.

  • Director's Note

    Program notes for the Realisation Stage of Danny Yung 2018

     

    We have reservations about the education system, because it has lost its focus. We have reservations about the current practice of history-writing, because the science of documentation has lost its focus. Myths from our ancestors serve as a mirror, reflecting the stories hidden in our bodies. At the same time, we observe the culture depicted by the stories in the mirror. Through myths and the mirror, we try to understand ourselves and our relationship with the environment again. We revisit history and discuss what exactly is history and knowledge.

    The oldest and most well-known myth in China is Classic of Mountains and Seas, which serves as an adventure map in itself. Yet, the actual adventures are manifested entirely through readers’ involvement and imagination. The later text Flowers in the Mirror narrates a journey that can be viewed as a prototype of Chinese myths. Greek myths, on the other hand, focuses on the love-hate relationships among human, gods and semi-gods, as well as their adventures across different worlds. When we read Greek myths, we are inevitably searching and exploring. We search for characters and episodes we can empathize with. We explore new intellectual and emotional heights inspired by the act of reading

    Medusa’s story in Greek mythologies often makes me think. While reading the many versions of Medusa, I started visualizing the writers from different eras who tried to interpret Medusa. I observed their perspectives and story angles. I pondered how their writing process has correlated with their immediate environments. Somehow, this process mirrors the way we create theatrical works – how self-conscious should we be? To project our own perspectives and angles? To engineer a relationship between our immediate environment and our creative process?

    In myths, Medusa is a beautiful lady corrupted by men. When her pleadings to the gods were unanswered, she cursed herself into death, and transformed into a monster that turned onlookers into stones. In the end, she was beheaded by a man shielded behind a mirror. The man retained her head as a weapon against his enemies (mostly men), who were all turned into stones.

    I wonder if performing artists wish to transform themselves into monsters that turn attentive audiences into stone statues? Perhaps all audiences are “men” to them? Will performing artists be used as weapons to tame hungry cultural consumers into thoughtless stone statues? Or rather, will performers be willingly tamed as weapons? How about the mirror? What role does the mirror play in this narrative? Will the mirror be the only tool left to remind us of our consciousness?

    We all care about the development of technology, the drive behind its development, as well as the relationship between its development and institution. We all want to know the development of the arts, the drive behind its development, as well as the relationship between its development and institution. We are curious about the mirror in human’s history – how it was invented, the drive behind its invention, as well as the relationship between its invention and institution. Does the history of art and technological development reflect the relationship between human and its institutions? Why has mirrors keep recurring in our myths? Shall we rely on it to rebuild the interaction between the creative process and the society? Just as theater recurs in our history, should we revisit our understanding of historical narratives? Shall we try to decipher and re-cultivate interaction among artistic creation, technological innovation and social development?

    In the experiment lab of mirrors, we are surrounded and intimidated by ourselves at the same time. We are enveloped by our ignorant and evasive selves. In a mirrored laboratory, we see endless dreams, but are also suffocated by the images of ourselves in the dreams. How should we deal with the act of dreaming, horrid dreams, nightmares, lustful dreams and day dreams? In the experimental lab, we see the frames and margins of mirrors, as if we have arrived in heaven, witnessing ourselves playing – playing with the frames, playing with the margins.

    About The Interrupted Dream

    The Interrupted Dream is about disrupted historical records in a museum. It was first conceptualized by three Asian artists from different performance backgrounds – Shen Yili, seasoned Kunqu lead actress from Shanghai; Didik Nini Thowok, a classical Javanese dancer pioneering in cross-gender performing arts; and Park Hobin, a dancer from Seoul. Together with 11 acrobatic students from Taipei, they create a testing ground for the Hong Kong Belt-Road City-to-City Cultural Exchange. Didik has always been fascinated by the concept of The Peony Pavilion, as well as Kunqu as an art form. A while ago, he translated Shan Po Yang, a song from The Interrupted Dream, The Peony Pavilion into Indonesian, and composed a new melody for it. This work then became the prelude scene of The Interrupted Dream. Set against a museum, The Interrupted Dream imagines the wake of Chinoiserie at the Palace of Versailles in the 16th century. It witnesses the manifestation of a lustful Chinese dream in the French royal court.

    About Monkey Business

    The stage isn’t a prison nor a cage. The theater is not comparable to a zoo in any way. Monkey Business opens with a cage scene, and finds its origin in the homework of some acrobatics students from the Taiwan Academy of Xiqu. We question whether stage technology is purely about skills? Whether acrobatics is merely a form of performance? Are people in acrobatic trainings reflective on the idea of skills? And is acrobatic education critical of the practice of busking? Was Sun Wukong, the Chinese Monkey King, only trying to mess around while causing a havoc in heavens? How comparable is our mirror-lined stage to the Colosseum? In Monkey Business, what comes first? The actors, the monkey, or the monk? Are they mocking the theater? Or the zoo? This performance is co-created by two performers Chang Yu-chau and Nget Rady, who specializes respectively in embodying the character of the monkey from two different cultural backgrounds. Together with Gordon Lee from Hong Kong, this “cross-cultural monkey show” is meant question the assumptions of the theater and the zoo.

  • Video

    The Interrupted Dream, Monkey Business New Vision Arts Festival 2018 Programme

  • 2017 Hong Kong Belt-Road Conference

  • 2017 Hong Kong Belt-Road Peformance

One Belt One Road Experimental Theatre

Studio Theatre, Hong Kong Cultural Centre

18

Oct

8PM

18 Oct

8PM

19

Oct

8PM

19 Oct

8PM

20

Oct

4PM

20 Oct

4PM

20

Oct

8PM

20 Oct

8PM
$200 (Free seating) $100 (Full-time students)
  • $200
Seating Plan
  • The Interrupted Dream: Chinois Dream at Château de Versailles

  • Heavenly Palace of Monkey Business

  • Timetable

  • Technical Partners

  • Academic Partners

  • Remarks

  • The Interrupted Dream: Chinois Dream at Château de Versailles

    The Interrupted Dream: Chinois Dream at Château de Versailles

     

    “[Didik Nini Thowok]… on the frontlines of cross-dressing performance art” The Jakarta Post

    “[Shen Yili] is in her prime time, with her comprehensive artistry.” Mingpao Monthly

    “The admirable, lively movements of Park Hobin were fascinating and enthralling.”– Munhwa Daily Newspaper

    An encasing mirrored theatre will become the meeting place for Indonesian, cross-gender, classical Javanese dancer Didik Nini Thowok and Shanghainese Kunqu artist Shen Yili. These two female leads not only become a reflection of one another, but they also project growth and progress through an exchange of teaching and learning. Together with contemporary choreographer Park Hobin from Seoul, they re-interpret the classical Chinese literary dream play written by the playwright of the Ming dynasty Tang Xianzu through a cross-language, cross-art, and cross-gender fashion.

    Studio Theatre, Hong Kong Cultural Centre
    18.10 (Thu) 8PM
    20.10 (Sat) 8PM  (with Post-Performance Talk)

    Creative and Production Team

    Curator, Artistic Director, Director & Designer: Danny Yung
    Curator & Spatial Designer: Mathias Woo
    Producer: WyWong yuewai
    Associate Director: Liu Xiaoyi (Singapore)
    Performers: Didik Nini Thowok (Yogyakarta), Shen Yili (Shanghai), Park Hobin (Seoul)
    Music: Nerve (Steve Hui)
    Visual/ Digital Images: Benny Woo
    Students of National Taiwan College of Performing Arts: Chen Yun-Ju, Hsiao Szu-Mien, Huang Bo-Nan, Kang Bo-Neng, Kang Hao-Chu, Li Jui-Hung, Lin Yu-Yuan, Liu Feng-Yu, Pan Ting-Wei, Yen Yu-Ting, Yu Yun- Chen
    Voice over: Pia Ho, Liu Xiaoyi, Melinda Gaskin
    Creative Coordinators: Cedric Chan, Melinda Gaskin

    Technical Advisor: Mak Kwok-fai
    Production Managers: Carmen Cheng, Chow Chun Yin
    Sound System Designers: Candog Ha; d&b audiotechnik: Alex Poon, Allen Tin
    Sound Designer: Chan Wing-kit
    Stage Lighting Design: Zoe Cheung
    Motion Capture System Development:Hong Kong Institute of Vocational Education

    Stage Manager: Satina Shum
    Deputy Stage Manager: Zeta Chan
    Assistant Stage Manager: Chan On-ki
    Video Operator: Johnny Sze
    Rehearsal Assistant: Dan Tse
    Wardrobe: Bonnie Chan
    Stage Crew: Yau Chun Hin, Keung Cheuk Chung

    Documentation
    Video Shooting: Alvin Lam, Wing Chan
    Editing: Patrick Siu
    Special Effects: Kenneth Cheng

    Acknowledgement: C.F. Loo Foundation, SEESAW Post Production, Huang Chao-hsin, Vivien Ku

  • Heavenly Palace of Monkey Business

    Heavenly Palace of Monkey Business

     

    “[Nget Rady] leapt around, striking formidable poses” The Strait Times

    “[Chang Yu-chau] a remarkable performer” The Washington Post

    Cambodian dance artist Nget Rady specialises in the monkey role of Lakhaon Kaol, a classical Cambodian male masked dance form. Chang Yu-chau from Taipei specialises in the Jingju monkey play of clown and is a master in martial arts skills. Chang portrays Sun Wukong in his rebellion against heaven from the classic Chinese tale, Journey to the West. From Zurich to Taipei, from classical Khmer dance to traditional Jingju, these two monkey leads tour across the Eurasian continent to compare two cultures, and the propagation and innovation of two traditional arts.

    Studio Theatre, Hong Kong Cultural Centre
    19.10 (Fri) 8PM (with Post-Performance Talk)
    20.10 (Sat) 4PM

    Creative and Production Team

    Curator, Artistic Director, Director & Designer: Danny Yung
    Curator & Spatial Designer: Mathias Woo
    Producer: WyWong yuewai
    Associate Director:Liu Xiaoyi  (Singapore)
    Performers: Nget Rady (Phnom Penh), Chang Yu-chau (Taipei), Gordon Lee (Hong Kong)
    Music: Nerve (Steve Hui)
    Visual/ Digital Images: Benny Woo
    Students of National Taiwan College of Performing Arts: Chen Yun-Ju, Hsiao Szu-Mien, Huang Bo-Nan, Kang Bo-Neng, Kang Hao-Chu, Li Jui-Hung, Lin Yu-Yuan, Liu Feng-Yu, Pan Ting-Wei, Yen Yu-Ting, Yu Yun- Chen
    Creative Coordinators: Cedric Chan, Melinda Gaskin

    Technical Advisor: Mak Kwok-fai
    Production Managers: Carmen Cheng, Chow Chun Yin
    Sound System Designers: Candog Ha; d&b audiotechnik: Alex Poon, Allen Tin
    Sound Designer: Chan Wing-kit
    Stage Lighting Design: Zoe Cheung
    Motion Capture System Development:Hong Kong Institute of Vocational Education

    Stage Manager: Satina Shum
    Deputy Stage Manager: Zeta Chan
    Assistant Stage Manager: Chan On-ki
    Video Operator: Johnny Sze
    Rehearsal Assistant: Dan Tse
    Wardrobe: Bonnie Chan
    Stage Crew: Yau Chun Hin, Keung Cheuk Chung

    Documentation
    Video Shooting: Alvin Lam, Wing Chan
    Editing: Patrick Siu
    Special Effects: Kenneth Cheng

    Acknowledgement: C.F. Loo Foundation, SEESAW Post Production, Huang Chao-hsin, Vivien Ku

  • Timetable

     

    1 The Interrupted Dream OCT 18 8PM
    2 Monkey Business  OCT 19 8PM Post-Performance Talk
    3 Monkey Business OCT 20 4PM
    4 The Interrupted Dream OCT 20 8PM Post-Performance Talk
  • Technical Partners

     

    Live streaming equipment supported by

  • Academic Partners

     

  • Remarks

    .Free seating
    .Running time approximately 80 minutes with no intermission
    .No latecomers will be admitted, until a suitable break in the performance.
    .Zuni Icosahedron reserves the right to add, withdraw or substitute artists and/or vary advertised programmes and seating arrangements.